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History

Staying at Brackenborough, you are part of a historic settlement with a thousand years of recorded history. Following meticulous research, Paul’s mother, Mrs Eleanor Bennett, has traced the ownership of the estate back to 1066 and earlier in her book Brackenborough: The Story of a Manor. Copies of this book are available for purchase.

The Hall, garden and Coach House
The Hall, garden and Coach House

The Coach House itself is an 18th century building, altered in the 19th century, with all original features still in place to delight the visitor. The Coach House clock, whose face adorns the south wall, with the mechanism a feature of the Granary Apartment, is by a 19th century clockmaker to the Prince of Wales, J.W. Benson.

Brackenborough Hall has a history with unknown beginnings, but the oldest part today is from the 16th century, although a manor house has certainly been there longer. The moat that surrounds the Hall, its Victorian kitchen garden, lawn, flower garden and Coach House dates back to the late 13th century, when having a moat was a significant status symbol! With many additions at different times, the impressive south facing frontage was built in the 1730s, (accounts for the building are in the book) and now looks out over the ancient Parkland where cows and calves graze in the summer months.

The deserted medieval village of Brackenborough
The deserted medieval village of Brackenborough

The Park is the site of the deserted medieval village of Brackenborough. The ‘humps and bumps’ in the Park show very clearly the shape of the village which existed from before the Doomsday Book (1086) until after the Black Death in the 14th century with a population at times of over 100 inhabitants. Inclusive guided tours of the house, grounds, deserted medieval village and farm are available to guests who are interested.